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The English written companion of Fake For Real: reviews, interviews and articles about rap music
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LORD NARF - Witchcraft

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Lord Narf honors Awful Records, and their collection of weirdos mostly based in Atlanta. She fully complies with the experimental aspirations of this iconoclastic band of rappers. Like them, she is the representative of a new generation for whom rap music is obvious and omnipresent – this young lady said in an interview that it was her parent's music: yes indeed, we are already there – but who don't feel obliged to preserve or elevate it. They don't have any special respect for it. They feel free to change it into anything they have in their little twisted minds.

LORD NARF - Witchcraft

Awful Records :: 2016 :: buy the album

After her recommendable Sick EP in 2015, the rapper refined her odd style on her next project; a project she produced - with the exclusive help from other members of Awful Records like Father, Alexandria, Tommy Genesis, Ethereal - and she named Witchcraft. Lord Narf, indeed, introduced herself as a witch, with her low and hypnotic voice. And her bizarre and ghostly music was sometimes strengthened with a dreadful organ, like with "Succession of Witches", or sprinkled with some sinister laughs, like with "Leave Yo Azz Alone". As she had proved already in the previous year with AUTOYURNT, a mixtape she had released with Slug Christ – the weirdest member of Awful Records – Lord Narf was not there to rub her listeners up the right way. On the opposite, she was there to break habits.

Nonetheless, this was still rap music, mixed with the expected R&B tracks, like when Alexandria sang on "Ex", and the rhythmic patterns inherited from Atlanta's own trap music. Even when she muttered, or when she used onomatopoeias and repetitions on "Free My Jack", "Quit It", and "Link Up", Lord Nard was some kind of traditional rapper. She had skills. She was at ease with her words, and able to change her pace, like with her double-time delivery on "For Free". And her subject matters - money, violence, sex, braggadocios - were unmistakably those of rap.

It was the same music, but turned upside down. Lord Nard made it new again, or even unrecognizable. With Witchcraft, she was nothing else than her own self. As expected with any release from Awful Records, this was original. This was confusing and disturbing. But this was good; and even awfully good, like when Lord Narf surprised us with some of her greater tracks like "Quit It" and "Link Up".

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